Why, I am the very pinke of curtesie

Well, I’m back from the brink, though not yet in the pink. Here are two more things about me:
3. I live in the upstairs flat of a pink house. While it is a lovely, lovely apartment, I think that the brilliant pink of the house, painted by my landlords who live downstairs, sold me on it. I knew that living in a pink house in this new city where I didn’t know anyone would bring me some cheer in the lonely damp that can pervade this place at times. And it does.
4. At this moment, I have pink hair. For reasons that I will not go into on this forum, I have had a trying time of late which culminated last week in a very long and unpleasant confrontation with professional arguers. For better or worse, it is over now. As a result I am feeling somewhat rebellious and so I did this:
I love it. I do query the professional read on this, however. I think a lot about what I wear in the classroom (hence the blog) and I find that I strive to balance the professional (and professorial) with personal style. That said, I do not work in a law office, nor is my department especially conservative (though some department members do fall on the conservative side, style-wise), so I think I can get away with this with few raised eyebrows (though there will definitely be a few raised eyebrows). The thing is, we all work hard to offer fresh and interesting work in our fields; indeed, especially as young scholars we are hired based on our potential for the new eyes we can cast on the artefacts we study. In my classroom, I also work hard to find new ways to reach students who are increasingly resistant to traditional teaching methods, and I am encouraged to do so. With this in mind then, why shouldn’t my personal style reflect something original and extraordinary, if that is what is valued in my work? That said, I don’t think I would ever dye my hair pink for a job interview and I’m glad that I don’t have a meeting with the Dean on my schedule within the next two weeks (it’s semi-permanent and will wash out eventually). But I also think that I am lucky to find myself in a department where the concept of academic freedom seems to be extended to our personal style as well (cf. Casual Sockless) and I do not think that this will be frowned upon. If I did, despite how much I am feeling like a recalcitrant teen, I never would have dyed my fringe pink.
Since tomorrow is the debut, I am planning on conservative dress. I’ll let you know how it plays out.

8 thoughts on “Why, I am the very pinke of curtesie

  1. But aren't Democrats blue in the US? Couldn't it have been a Democratic support hair dye? I'm sure the purple streaks were rad, Rad, and your mother would be proud. My mother doesn't know about my pink hair and I'm fairly certain that the local NDP MLA won't tell her. But who knows how far a reach the NDP have.And yes, I can only go so far with the non-traditional teaching. So far it amounts to assignments that aren't just essays, though the essays are still the money-makers (so to speak) and I don't know how NOT to grade students. Though it's interesting how "non-traditional" seems to translate for students into "you do the work for me." My favourite complaint received in a student evaluation for a larger class: "During lecture all Medievalist does is talk." This makes my brain hurt a little.My current students love the pink hair. And so far, so do my colleagues. Hurrah!

  2. I love the pink hair. I haven't done cool hair since the late 90s, when a member of the local Democratic party in my college town threatened to call my mother when I dyed a couple streaks dark purple (during the summer). I totally hear you on the students not wanting traditional teaching methods, but yet I still give grades and we have to be accredited by traditional bodies (who like trendy things like "quantitative assessment tools!").

  3. But aren't Democrats blue in the US? Couldn't it have been a Democratic support hair dye? I'm sure the purple streaks were rad, Rad, and your mother would be proud. My mother doesn't know about my pink hair and I'm fairly certain that the local NDP MLA won't tell her. But who knows how far a reach the NDP have.And yes, I can only go so far with the non-traditional teaching. So far it amounts to assignments that aren't just essays, though the essays are still the money-makers (so to speak) and I don't know how NOT to grade students. Though it's interesting how "non-traditional" seems to translate for students into "you do the work for me." My favourite complaint received in a student evaluation for a larger class: "During lecture all Medievalist does is talk." This makes my brain hurt a little.My current students love the pink hair. And so far, so do my colleagues. Hurrah!

  4. I love the pink hair. I haven't done cool hair since the late 90s, when a member of the local Democratic party in my college town threatened to call my mother when I dyed a couple streaks dark purple (during the summer). I totally hear you on the students not wanting traditional teaching methods, but yet I still give grades and we have to be accredited by traditional bodies (who like trendy things like "quantitative assessment tools!").

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